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Interactive Graphic: Injury Rates at Workplaces in the United States

Earlier this year, in response to a FOIA lawsuit OSHA published a treasure trove of data on workplace injury and illness covering around a half-million worksites across the US for 2016, 2017 and 2018. The Trump administration OSHA wasn't particularly excited about making the data readily accessible so they only released it as a raw data dump on their website (which you can download for yourself here). The data is in three massive files that are really difficult to work with.


In the interest of making this data more accessible and easily usable I built an interactive dashboard so workers and researchers can quickly filter and search the data and understand what's going on in different workplaces. Because the raw data was user-entered data submitted by around 500,000 different HR managers, it was full of formatting errors that needed to be cleaned before any mapping or analysis was possible. You can see the Trifacta cleaning flow that I used to clean the data here.


The raw data set includes the number of workers at each site, the number of hours worked, and three main types of injuries:

  • Injuries where a worker had to miss days of work as a result of being hurt (DAWF)

  • Injuries where a worker had to be transferred out of their normal job or put on restricted (light) duty

  • All other injuries that required more than first aid

Based on those numbers we calculate two important metrics that allow us to compare workplaces of different sizes.

  • Total Recordable Injury Rate (TRIR) - The number of all recordable injuries per 100 workers per year. To account for part time jobs and jobs with lots of overtime we start with the total hours worked and divide by the standard work-year (2,000 hours). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average TRIR for all jobs in 2019 was 3.0 injuries per 100 workers per year.

  • Days Away Restricted Duty or Transferred Rate (DART) - The number of injuries that required workers to miss work or be put on restricted duty per 100 workers per year. To account for part time jobs and jobs with lots of overtime we start with the total hours worked and divide by the standard work-year (2,000 hours). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the average DART for all jobs in 2019 was 1.6 injuries per 100 workers per year.

Use the filters on the right to search by company name, facility size, or injury rates! You should be able to export the data as-is but if you have any trouble feel free to shoot me an email at Patrick (at) pjyoung.info


For folks who prefer to look at spreadsheets, I uploaded a subset of the cleaned data to a Google Sheet. Because the full data sets are much larger than Google Sheets' file size limit I only included facilities with more than 50 employees for 2018 (the most recent year released so far.


Stay safe!




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